Review: The Art Society’s Creative Lock-In

 Photo courtesy of Ruth Choi, Art Society

Photo courtesy of Ruth Choi, Art Society

By Stephanie Hammer

Starting at 10 PM on November 2, the Art Society held its biannual Creative Lock-In at the Barron theatre. A string of fairly lights had been hung up, and the bleachers pushed to the back wall, leaving the full floor space open for students to sit and create. Blankets were spread out across the floor to make sitting more comfortable, and visitors were encouraged to bring their own pillows. Tea and coffee were also provided.

The lock-in, which lasted until 4 AM the following morning, is a well-established Art Society event, and provides a communal creative environment in which to create art and poetry, as well as to socialise. Contrary to popular belief, visitors are not actually locked into the Barron Theatre, but can filter in and out of the event as they like (though, of course, staying is encouraged).

 Photo courtesy of Ruth Choi, Art Society.

Photo courtesy of Ruth Choi, Art Society.

Though this particular creative lock-in started on a Thursday, rather than the customary Friday evening, the event was still well-attended, and the space filled quickly after 10pm. Many people even opted to stay late. Approaching the venue, the band, Too This For That, could be heard playing music for the first few hours of the event, providing a good atmosphere. Besides the band, the lock-in included life drawing in a room adjacent to the main theatre space, a painting wall, and a watercolour station, among other highlights. Materials were provided at the latter two stations, and challenges such as ‘use red, blue, and yellow only’ were posted next to the watercolour station. This meant that visitors did not necessarily have to come with materials or with a project in mind; they could be inspired on the spot. Most (if not all) of the people present did bring their own supplies, though, as the boxes of paints, pencils, and chalks spread around the room made clear, but this was not obligatory.

Most people sat in small groups, sketching, painting, writing, and working on other projects. Though there was a steady hum of conversation, the atmosphere was also one of focus and absorption!

As a follow-up to the lock-in, the Art Society is hoping to exhibit the works created, an event in which the painting wall will surely be a focal point!

HASTA